Wedding Day Trend Alert: Capture the Moment Without Spoiling the Tradition

courtesy of Gina Leigh Photography via pbfingers.com

While traditionally speaking, it’s always been said to be bad luck for brides and grooms to see each other before the ceremony, we explored the benefits of kicking this tradition to the curb in our post, Catching a Glimpse ,and choosing to have a moment prior to the ceremony for just the two of you to see and be with each other.  Perks remain:

  • an intimate moment for just the two of you to share without having to share yourselves with everyone else
  • it not only creates beautifully candid shots of the two of you…
  • but it also can create time to get some of your “formal” wedding pictures out of the way (ie. bridal party, portraits, family shots, etc.) while everyone is at their freshest
  • and finally, can make for some uniquely beautiful memories

However – and this is a HUGE however - a girlfriend of mine (wad up, Linds!) sent me a link today exploring a ‘Behind the Door’ technique, which proves brides who are both trendy AND traditional can have her cake and eat it too when it comes to this!  (Sooo stinkin’  sad I didn’t think of it myself!)

The ‘Behind the Door’ technique puts you and your main squeeze right next to each other without revealing the way either one looks.  How, you might ask?  Well, by leaving a door – be it the one that enters into the bridal suite door or the church or wherever – and giving you a moment to hold hands, share in the moment and capture the memory… all without ever having to give up the tradition of the grand reveal! 

I mean how can you not love this idea?!?!  My hubs is my best friend.  He’s the one I talk to when I’m extremely happy or super sad or overly worried or incredibly annoying (you get the idea); so, it was very difficult to not have him there on the biggest day of our lives to share in that time with me.  Because we chose to stay on the side of tradition on our big day and didn’t see each other until my Papa walked me down the aisle — we felt it added to the anticipation and excitement of it all, we weren’t able to talk to each other :(  But if we would’ve done this, we could’ve had the BEST of BOTH worlds!  Check out Julie’s pics from her Peanut Butter Fingers Blog below:

courtesy of Gina Leigh Photography via pbfingers.com

Catching a Glimpse: Should You See Each Other before the Ceremony?

photos courtesy of elimurray.com

Traditionally speaking, it’s considered “bad luck” for a bride and groom to see each other before the ceremony.  This type of old-fashioned thinking stems from an even more ancient tradition when the groom was not allowed to see his bride AT ALL before the big day.  Not ever.  Not once.  Not even a glimpse.  Nada.

While I’m happy to report that prearranged marriages and hide ‘n’ go seek brides - for the most part – have been eradicated in most cultures, there are still several people who like to hold the base of this tradition true.  Often times, couples will choose to not see each other beforehand because they feel it adds to the excitement and anticipation of their wedding day.  (Agree.)

Others, however, have poo-poo’ed  conventional thinking for a more modern day train of thought and choose to have a moment before the ceremony all to themselves.  This is a time just for them to really take each other in, and better yet, a time for a photographer to capture some beautifully candid shots.  (I mean, just get a load of this groom!)  Couples can have a moment of privacy to talk, hug, give a little smooch or simply calm each other’s nerves.  (Also, agree.)

For brides and grooms who see each other pre-ceremony, it can also help take care of some of the formal wedding photography of the bridal party, in order to allot more time after for everything else.  Woot, woot!  But regardless of what you choose, just know that there is no right or wrong choice… merely Choice 1 and Choice 2, and it’s up to you to decide which one fits you and yours best!  Good luck, and cheers to many years of happiness :)

photos courtesy of elimurray.com